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SIRVA

Flu Season: 2017 – 2018

In literal terms, the flu season is an annually (yearly) recurring period of time that is characterized by the prevalence of influenza virus outbreaks. Due to the frequency of germ spreading actions (sneezing, coughing, etc..) in lower temperatures, the flu season occurs during the colder half of the year. Thus, the flu season typically lasts from October through March, occasionally until May, and reaches it’s peak around February.

This year’s flu season follows suit; it officially began roughly one week ago (October 2017) despite unusually high temperatures around the country, and will run through until March 2018. During the flu season, reported cases of influenza often increase nearly tenfold, sometimes even more.

 

Flu Symptoms

Influenza is a very common and highly contagious respiratory infection that when left improperly treated, can cause serious illness and in some cases, can lead to death. When you have the flu, you tend to develop a bad cough, sneezing, a stuffy head, and generally feel “bad” all over. The most common symptoms of the flu include:

  • Fever (lasts 3-4 days)
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle/body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Vomiting/diarrhea (more common in children)

Due to similarities in the symptoms, people tend to get confused as to whether they have the flu or a cold. However, the speed and intensity of the onset of the symptoms is far greater when dealing with the flu.

 

Flu Complications

Ordinarily, people infected with the flu can recover in as little as three days and sometimes as much as two weeks on the higher end. However, some people develop prolonged complications as a result of the virus, some of which can even be life-threatening. Some of these complications may include:

  • Pneumonia
  • Bronchitis
  • Myocarditis (inflammation of the heart)
  • Encephalitis (inflammation of the brain)
  • Sinus infection
  • Ear infection
  • Organ failure (most severe)

The flu can also intensify chronic health problems. For example, someone with asthma may experience severe, more frequent asthma attacks when they have the flu, or someone with chronic congestive heart failure could experience worsening of their condition, which is triggered by the flu.

 

Flu Treatment

Treatment tends to depend on your symptoms, meaning if you have nasal or sinus congestion, then a decongestant can be helpful. If you have a runny nose and consistent sneezing and coughing, an antihistimine could be most helpful. If you are diagnosed with the flu, antiviral drugs could be a treatment option, but you should check with your doctor promptly if you are at risk of serious complications. For the most part, however, people prefer treating the flu with home remedies.

In general, at-home treatment consists of taking in plenty of fluids and getting rest to let your body fight the infection on its own. To help alleviate symptoms, over-the-counter anti-inflammatory pain relievers or throat lozenges are also recommended if the pain or discomfort becomes too much. The CDC recommends taking the following steps to treat the flu:

  1. If prescribed by a doctor, take antiviral drugs
  2. Get rest and heavily increase your fluid intake
    • Drink water, orange juice or sports drinks to help flush out toxins from your body
  3. Take everyday precautions to protect others
    • Limit contact with people as much as possible
    • Cover your nose/mouth when coughing and sneezing to prevent spreading germs
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water
    • Clean and disinfect surfaces/objects that may be contaminated
  4. Stay at home until you are better
    • CDC recommends that you stay home at least 24 hours after your fever is gone (except to get medical care) WITHOUT the use of fever-reducing medicine

 

Here is a helpful resource to reference when deciding how to treat the flu. The CDC also has a wealth of information on how to prevent and treat the flu on their website.

 

If you or your loved ones decide to get the flu shot as a preventative measure for the upcoming flu season and suffer an adverse reaction as a result, you may be eligible for compensation for pain and suffering, psychological or physical damages, or lost wages from missing work. Contact the attorneys at My Vaccine Lawyer for your free consultation.

The 2017-2018 Flu Season: Facts, Symptoms, Complications and Treatment

Flu Season: 2017 - 2018 In literal terms, the flu season is an annually (yearly) recurring period of time that is characterized by the prevalence of influenza virus outbreaks. Due to the frequency of germ spreading actions (sneezing, coughing, etc..) in lower temperatures, the flu season occurs during the colder half of the year. Thus, the flu season typically lasts from October through March, occasionally until May, and reaches it’s peak around February. This year’s flu season follows suit; it officially began roughly one week ago (October 2017) despite unusually high temperatures around the country, and will run through until March 2018....

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The Vaccine Injury Table Has Been Revised to Include GBS and SIRVA

The Vaccine Injury Table is a chart that outlines vaccines and possible vaccine injuries that are recognized as compensable cases by the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). While vaccine injuries not listed on the table may also be compensated, if a vaccine injury fits within the parameters set forth in the Vaccine Injury Table, the burden shifts to the government to prove that the vaccine did not cause the injury. These “table cases” are often easier to prove in Court. As of late 2016, two common vaccine injuries, Guillain-Barre Syndrome (“GBS”) and SIRVA (“Shoulder Injury Resulting from Vaccine Administration”), were not...

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Effective Immediately: The Statute of Limitations for Shoulder Injuries and Guillain-Barre Syndrome Cases Has Been Extended [Retroactively] to March 27th, 2009.

Effective March 21, 2017, the vaccine injury table was amended to include: Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) from an influenza vaccine; and Shoulder injury cases (SIRVA).   This means that someone diagnosed with a shoulder injury or GBS following a flu vaccine as far back as March 20, 2009, could be entitled to money damages.   Accordingly, if you or someone you know had GBS or a shoulder injury from vaccination at any time from March 20, 2009 forward, and you or that person either did not know about the vaccine program in time to file a claim or the claim was filed within the past...

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We Are Seeing A Definitive Increase In Shoulder Injury (“SIRVA”) Claims

SIRVA (“shoulder injury related to vaccine administration”) is caused by an injury to the musculoskeletal structures of the shoulder – ligaments, tendons, bursae –  due to trauma from a needle entering the bursa and/or rotator cuff, resulting in an inflammatory response. The injury is typically the result of injecting too high on the shoulder. Rather than entering the muscle tissue in the portion of the shoulder between the elbow and the joint, the needle enters the joint space, resulting in a physical trauma injury to the shoulder.

An Article from The Washington Post feat. Paul Brazil

Last December during a routine physical exam, I received a vaccination to protect against several strains of pneumonia. It hurt, more so than the usual injection. In the days that followed, the pain in my left shoulder worsened. Initially, I dismissed it as typical post-shot soreness. But it didn’t go away. All these months later, it still hurts. My orthopedist says I have subacromial bursitis, which is a chronic inflammation and excess fluid buildup in the bursa (a thin, lubricated sac that prevents friction between a bone and surrounding soft tissue) separating the acromion bone at the top of the shoulder from the rotator cuff.

Vaccine Injury Payouts Rise

Below is an article from the Wall Street Journal regarding the rise of vaccine injury payouts over the past few years — specifically those involving shoulder injuries related to vaccine administration (“SIRVA”).  Our firm is part of the reason for this rise, as we have dedicated our practice to the representation of hundreds of clients suffering from SIRVA injuries over the past few years.  If you or someone you know has suffered a shoulder injury from vaccination, please contact us for a free case evaluation.   

Max Muller of My Vaccine Lawyer Wins Compensation for Woman who Suffered a Shoulder Injury from Vaccine Administration (“SIRVA”)

Attorney Max Muller was retained by a woman who suffered a shoulder injury following a flu shot and pneumonia vaccine.  Immediately following the vaccination, she felt intense left upper arm pain and swelling and developed redness, swelling and a lump at the vaccination sites.

Preventing Serious Shoulder Injuries from Vaccine Administration

The following is an article from the Journal of American Pharmacists Association.  The article outlines important information and recommendations for preventing shoulder injuries from improper vaccine administration.  If you or a loved one suffered a shoulder injury from the administration of a vaccination, contact the national vaccine attorneys at My Vaccine Lawyer today to discuss your rights and potential compensation.

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Erroneous administration of intramuscular vaccines, particularly above the deltoid muscle, can result in serious shoulder injuries and diminished vaccine efficacy.

Shoulder Injuries Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA)

During the March 8, 2012 Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines, Dr. Tom Ryan, Medical Officer from the Division of Vaccine Injury Compensation, presented regarding shoulder injuries following vaccine administration.  Dr. Ryan indicated that evidence convincingly supports a causal relationship between any vaccine that is injected with a needle and shoulder injury.  The injury is caused by the injection itself, not by the specific vaccine injected.